Saturday, January 23, 2016

Count of Pesukim in each Parsha

The counts were taken from the Art Scroll Chumash notes at the end of each parsha. Note that while the masoretic count of Tzav is 96, A physical count of Pesukim shows 97.

 Pekudei does not have a note at the end of the parsha but the Art Scroll commentary says the edition of the Chumash printed with the Malbim's commentary.gives it as 92 (which matches the physical count in the chumash)

Yisro appears to use the taamei elyon count (10 pesukim) instead of the taamei tachton count (13 pesukim) for the total given at the comment at the end. This is based on comparing the note to the physical count as printed in the Chumash.

The mesorah note for Vayeilech of 70 appears for the combined parshiyos of Nitzavim and Vayeilech. This means 40 in Nitzavim and 30 in Vayeilech

 The Art Scroll Chumash on the page right after Vzos Haberachah give the total count according to the Mesorah for each sefer and for the total number of pesukim in the Torah.

Bereishis1534
Shmos1209
Vayikra859
Bamidbar1288
Devorim955
Total 5845

However, These numbers do not appear to match the totals calculated from the numbers given at the end of each parsha

Bereishis1534
Shmos1206
Vayikra858
Bamidbar1288
Devorim952
Total5838

It appears that the difference in Shmos is the Aseres Hadibros in Yisro between the Taamei Elyon and Taamei Tachton (3 pesukim) The difference in Vayikra is the mesorah note in Tzav and the physical count in Tzav. Vaeschanan starts the Taam Tachton at 5:6 and ends at 5:18, also for a count of 13. This accounts for the three total difference. However the mesorah count at the end says 118 while the printed count shows 7+49+30+25+11 = 122  However, the sefer total differs by 3 rather than 4 so there must be another difference in the sefer.

 Double AA points out: In an answer on judaism.stackexchange.com I show that the correct mesorah note in old manuscripts for Vaeschanan is 119 which solves the issue in that parsha, but the book total issue remains for Artscroll. However, in Mechon Mamre's edition based on the old manuscripts, Yisro has only 74 verses and Vaeschanan has only 121 verses (counting both with taamei tachton, unlike how the individual parsha mesorah does) which gives the correct traditional book totals below of 1209 and 955. So the individual parsha mesorah uses the taamei elyon while the book total uses the taamei tachton, and there are no issues remaining when we use the manuscript versions.

I found a blog at eSefer - Aseres Hadibros which discusses the differences and  has a comment

all bible texts published by mosad harav kook are based on the edition prepared by r. mordechai breuer

on breuer, see http://agmk.blogspot.com/2007/02/r-mordechai-breuer-ztll-master-masoret.html#links

he explains the trop to the first two pesukim in depth in his "dividing the decalogue into verses and commandments" in The Ten Commandments In History and Tradition, ed. Ben Zion Segal (1990), pp. 291-330.


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http://agmk.blogspot.com/

and

The Kesav Ve'hakabalah has a fascinating discussion of the different verse totals of the Decalogue reflected in the various masoretic notes. He claims that there are actually four versions of the division of the decalogue into verses: a) 12 verses - our tahton b) 9 verses - our elyon c) 13 verses - our tahton but with anochi and lo yiheh split into two d) 10 verses - our elyon but with anochi and lo yiheh combined into one. He maintains that the four masoretic totals (end of yisro, end of shemos, end of va'es'hanan and end of devarim) actually reflect the four versions; do the arithmetic and you'll see that he's apparently correct. [I first came across this dicussion of his in an issue of the Ihud Be'hidud weekly ...] Note that this is at the end of the sefer after Devarim.

ParshaCountSefer TotalTotalSecular Year
Breishis146146146
Noach153299299
Lech Lecha126425425
Vayera147572572
Chayei Sara105677677
Toldos106783783
Vayetzei148931931
Vyishlach15410851085
Vayeshev11211971197
Miketz14613431343
Vayigash10614491449
Vaychi8515341534
Shmos1241241658
Vaeira1212451779
Bo1053501884
Beshalach1164662000
Yisro725382072
Mishpatim1186562190
Terumah967522286
Tetzaveh1018532387
Ki Sisa1399922526
Vayakhel12211142648
Pekudei9212062740
Vayikra1111112851
Tzav962072947
Shmini912983038
Tazria673653105
Metzora904553195
Acharei Mos805353275
Kedoshim645993339
Emor1247233463
Behar57780 3520
Bechukosai788583598
Bamidbar15915937571 CE is 3761
Naso1763353933173
Beha'aloscha1364714069309
Shlach1195904188428
Korach956854283523
Chukas877724370610
Balak1048764474714
Pinchas16810444642882
Mattos11211564754994
Masei132128848861126
Devarim10510549911231
Va'eschanan11922451101350
Eikev11133552211461
Re'eh12646153471587
Shoftim9755854441684
Ki Seitzei11066855541794
Ki Savo12279056761916
Nitzavim4083057161956
Vayeilech3086057461986
Ha'azinu5291257982038
Vezos Habrachah4195358392079

1 comment:

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